dental care

Finding a Good Dentist

Posted on Apr 18, 2018

Finding a Good Dentist

Finding a new dentist can be as easy as opening the phone book or doing a quick Internet search. However, this doesn’t guarantee that you will find a quality dentist. In order to locate someone who can treat your entire family for years to come, it’s important to take your time in making this choice. We recommend that you start with learning as much as you can about the dentist’s qualifications. Pay Attention to Service Offerings Gone are the days when the neighborhood dentist only cleaned teeth and referred any other services to a specialist. Today’s dental patients are busy people who need all of their services under one roof. At Pearl Dental Care, we are pleased to offer our patients the following: • Traditional dentures • Dental implants • Endodontic treatment • Cosmetic dentistry • Restorative dentistry • Dental surgery • Orthodontics • Metal-free fillings • CEREC same-day implants and crowns If the dentist you are considering visiting does not offer all of these services, you may end up spending more time and money on dental treatment than you originally anticipated. Dr. Bhavin Changela has the qualifications to complete nearly any type of dental procedure you may need. He is happy to provide you with additional information or references upon request. Should you have questions about a specific offering at Pearl Dental Care, we encourage you to schedule a consultation. This gives you the opportunity to have all of your questions answered in a single session as well as see before and after photos of patients who have had the same procedure you are...

Read More

How Much it Cost to Have a Traditional Braces?

Posted on Mar 7, 2018

How Much it Cost to Have a Traditional Braces?

Traditional metal braces have long been the treatment of choice to align crooked or crowded teeth. Since most dental insurance companies only cover a portion of the cost, patients or their parents want to know, “How much it cost to have a traditional braces?” This is always a question when to consider the financial and time commitment necessary for successful orthodontic treatment. Knowing how much to budget or to set aside in your Health Savings Account helps to lessen anxiety so you or your child can go into the treatment process with confidence. Nationwide Average Cost for Traditional Metal Braces Across the country, the typical cost for orthodontic treatment with metal braces is $5,200. However, several factors may influence your final cost. These include: A fee for the initial consultation Cost for retainers after braces are removed Choosing a material other than metal for the brackets and wires on the braces Whether you or your child requires treatment beyond the typical 24 months Area of the country where you live. Medical and dental costs in the Midwest tend to be lower than they are on the East and West coasts. Sometimes people decide to receive treatment with clear braces instead after having their initial consultation. In that case, the average nationwide cost is $6,500. Trade-offs for the higher cost include a shorter treatment duration and the ability to be discreet about dental treatment. Dr. Bhavin Changela of Pearl Dental Clinic will prepare a written estimate of all anticipated costs during your initial consultation. Our office staff will also help you research methods to pay for orthodontic treatment, including applying for Care Credit. This is a third-party health financing company that offers low monthly payment options and interest rates for qualified customers. Pearl Dental Clinic also accept all major credit cards. Misaligned or crowded teeth are more than just a cosmetic concern. They can also make it more difficult to clean your teeth, a problem that leads to tooth decay and other serious dental issues. We encourage you to schedule a consultation today to learn more about traditional metal braces as well as financing...

Read More

Importance of Children’s Teeth from 6-12

Posted on Mar 9, 2017

Now that your child has all of their teeth and have a cute smile, take lots of pictures, because now comes the part where all their little teeth are going to start falling out! At about age five or six, children begin to lose their top and bottom front teeth. Between the ages of six to 12, they will usually lose all of their baby teeth. Besides helping children chew and pronounce words, the baby teeth hold a place in the jaws for the permanent teeth, which begin pushing the baby teeth out. The first permanent teeth come between six and seven years, which are the molars. During this time your child’s smile will be uneven, with some big and small teeth and even some gaps or baby teeth. By age 12 or 13 most kids have lost all of their baby teeth and have a full set of permanent teeth. Keeping your child’s teeth clean is a very important step in preventing cavities. By the age six or seven children should be able to brush their own teeth, with child supervision of course. Child-sized toothbrushes are easiest for kids to use. The head of the toothbrush is a lot smaller so it’s easier to fit in their mouths and reach further back. Around age 10 or 11, most children should be able to brush their teeth with no supervision. Here are a few brushing tips: Place toothbrush against the gums. Move brush in a circular motion. Brush the outer, upper and lower surfaces of the teeth. Repeat same method on the inside and chewing surfaces of the teeth. Finish by brushing the tongue to help freshen breath and remove bacteria. Flossing is another important part of keeping teeth clean and healthy. Flossing removes plaque from between the teeth where the toothbrush bristles cannot reach. When your child is ready to floss and gently clean between the teeth, they should be flossing at least once a day. You can protect your child’s teeth with sealants. A sealant is a material that is applied to teeth where decay occurs most often, which is usually the back molars on the chewing surfaces. These teeth have pits and grooves that are hard to clean, the sealant bonds to the tooth and protects teeth from plaque and acid attacks. Sealing a tooth is fast and painless. Sealants can last several years before they need to be...

Read More

Wisdom Teeth

Posted on Nov 10, 2016

Wisdom teeth are the last teeth to erupt. They come out in the late teens to early twenties. When they come through correctly, healthy wisdom teeth can help you chew. It’s normal to feel a little discomfort when your wisdom teeth appear, but if you have pain, see your dentist immediately. If there isn’t enough room for your wisdom teeth to come out they will be misaligned and require removal. When the wisdom teeth are misaligned they can cause crowding of the teeth and can damage the teeth that are around them and can also cause damage to the nerves. Wisdom teeth can also be impacted which can cause some pain, including jaw pain and tenderness, redness and swelling of the gums around the tooth, bad breath, or a bad taste when you bite down on food. You can sometimes relieve minor irritation by rinsing with warm salt water. Over-the-counter pain relievers also may help. If the tooth continues to cause pain, is infected or interferes with nearby teeth, the usual treatment is to take it out. Extracting one tooth can take 5 to 30 minutes, depending on where it is. In some cases, an infection requires antibiotics. Impacted wisdom teeth do not always show symptoms, meaning you could have impacted teeth and not even realize it. If symptoms do start, it is usually the result of the gum on top of the tooth becoming infected or swollen. Symptoms may include pain, swollen and bleeding gums, swelling around the jaw, bad breath, headache or jaw ache, and an unpleasant taste when eating. Impacted wisdom teeth that are left untreated can lead to gum disease and tooth decay, not only to the wisdom tooth itself but to the teeth around it. If you do not experience any of these symptoms then you are one of the lucky people that get to keep their wisdom teeth. But keep in mind they are all the way in the back of the mouth so they will be a little harder to clean. The toothbrush head doesn’t always reach back there, so make sure to visit your dentist regularly for your...

Read More

Dental Health During Pregnancy

Posted on Oct 4, 2016

Did you know that pregnancy can cause changes in the mouth gums and teeth, even in the healthiest women? That’s why it is important to go to the dentist regularly for check-ups and cleanings. Dental x-rays and anesthesia are rarely dangerous to unborn baby, even during the first trimester. Dental X-rays are among the safest, and there is no reason to avoid them if your treatment cannot wait until after the baby is born. The risk of an undetected dental problem could have a larger impact on an unborn baby than the x-ray itself. Dental X-rays are now digital so they give off less radiation than the traditional x-ray method. Lead aprons are provided when taking x-rays to protect your abdomen. Morning sickness can affect your oral health. If you experience morning sickness frequently, the acid from your stomach can wear off your enamel. Be sure to rinse your mouth out with water or with a fluoride mouthwash to keep the acid level under control. Periodontal disease (gum disease) is a bacterial infection, which can produce toxins in the body. Growing evidence suggests a link between gum disease and premature, underweight births. More research is needed to confirm how gum disease affects pregnancy outcomes. But it appears that gum disease triggers increased levels of biological fluids that induce labor. Gum disease doesn’t always show symptoms, some women may not know they have it. The only way to know for sure is by going to your local dentist for your routine checkup during pregnancy. Pregnancy gingivitis occurs more frequently during pregnancy because the increased level of hormones. When you get pregnant, your body begins producing maternal hormones, which can affect your gums and make them red, swollen and inflamed. It can also make your gums more likely to bleed. Keeping your teeth clean especially focusing a little more around the gum line will help reduce or even prevent pregnancy gingivitis. Also instead of eating sweets substitute them with fruits, vegetables, and...

Read More

Dry Mouth Causes and Treatment

Posted on Jul 22, 2016

Dry mouth, sometimes referred to as xerostomia, can happen to anyone. This condition occurs when your mouth doesn’t produce enough saliva to keep it moist. Everyone experiences dry mouth from time to time, such as when thirsty, hot, stressed, or anxious. Chronic (recurrent) dry mouth, however, is a medical condition requiring attention. Causes of Dry Mouth Medications: Certain medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, can cause an array of symptoms including dry mouth. Cancer treatments: including radiation treatment and chemotherapy. Nerve damage: If an injury to your head or neck has caused damage to nerves, then your salivary glands may no longer produce saliva. Salivary gland dysfunction Diabetes, jogren’s syndrome, HIV, sleep apnea, tobacco use How to relieve dry mouth Follow these tips to get relief and protect your teeth: Drink more water. Brush and floss twice a day. Eat regular meals. Avoid alcohol, caffeine, carbonated beverages and smoking. Avoid overly salty foods. Avoid overly salty foods. Use artificial saliva, available at your local pharmacy. Use nonprescription saliva substitutes that you can buy at a pharmacy. Visit your dentist regularly. Ask your dentist for advice specific to your...

Read More