Posts Tagged "oral health"

The importance of oral health and your body

Posted on Jun 17, 2016

New research suggests that the health of your mouth mirrors the condition of your body as a whole. For example, when your mouth is healthy,chances are your overall health is good, too. Research also shows that good oral health may actually prevent certain diseases from occurring. In some cases, oral problems can be a symptom of other diseases, such as diabetes. Research has also linked gum disease to heart disease, premature birth and even knee arthritis. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease cause by bacterial species found in plaque below the gums. Periodontal disease is also known as gum disease. It can cause swollen gums, irritation and bleeding. Often people learn they have been living with diabetes because their dentist or periodontist told them. Then when they go and get tested they find out they have diabetes. There are distinct oral signs on the gums that dentist and periodontist can see that make it known that you may have diabetes. The diabetes and periodontal disease feed off each other. The reason the negative impact of gum disease goes beyond the mouth is gum disease is an active bacterial infection that has access to the whole body via the bloodstream. The bacteria can destroy flesh and bone tissue in the mouth, leading to severe gum problems and tooth loss. The immune system recognizes the gum disease as the rampant bacterial infection it is. One way the body defeats an infection is to increase the inflammation in the local area of the infection in an effort to increase blood flow thus increase the number of white blood cells to fight the infections. Swollen, painful gums, bleeding when brushing or flossing are clear signs of an active bacterial infection in the mouth and an early warning sign of serious gum disease (this is also a sign that many people ignore). More serious problems begin to occur when the bacteria present in the mouth from gum disease travel to other parts of the body.   At this point, it is now a system wide chronic inflammation that contributes to and sets the stage for other diseases like arthritis, diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Thus, gum disease really is one of the main pathways, like a gateway disease, that helps support the conditions that allow system wide diseases to establish and flourish. Healthy smile, Healthy...

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How smoking affects your oral health

Posted on May 18, 2016

Not only is smoking bad for your health, it is also very bad for your oral health as well. Smoking can lead to the following dental problems: Gum disease Bone loss Tooth loss Tooth discoloration Bad breath Oral cancer Studies have found that tobacco use may be one of the biggest risk factors in the development of periodontal disease. Periodontal (gum) disease is a bacterial infection. It destroys soft tissue and bone that keep your teeth in place. In early stages of the disease, you may notice that your gums bleed when you brush or floss. You may also feel some sensitivity on your teeth too which is caused by your gums receding and some root be exposed. As this gets worse you start to notice that the gums start to pull away from the tooth when the gums start to pull away from your teeth, your teeth start to become loose and that can be painful and also lead to some teeth to fall out. Not only does smoking increase the chance that you will develop gum disease, it makes treatment much more difficult. And the treatment is less likely to succeed. That’s because smoking slows down the healing process in your mouth. Given all of the risks and complications of smoking on oral health it is very important that smokers do not skip regular checkups with their dentists. By staying on top of regular dentist visits, smokers can also benefit from professional cleanings. Having a proper oral hygiene plan is extremely important for smokers. Smokers should not only be brushing their teeth twice daily but also flossing and using mouthwash. The smoke is full of bacteria that affect your oral hygiene. Be sure to find a toothbrush that reaches all the way to the back of the molars. And the bristles have to be hard enough to get all that tar off of the crevasses of the teeth. Smokers should also buy toothpaste that is made specifically for smokers, as they are chemically stronger and better able to tackle harder to clean...

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How snacking affects your dental health

Posted on May 2, 2016

What you often eat can affect your teeth. Eating habits and good choices can lead to tooth decay. Sugary foods and drinks, including sports drinks can damage teeth. Snacking throughout the day can also lead to tooth decay. If you don’t brush, plaque will accumulate on the teeth. Plaque thrives on the starches and sugars that are found in a great deal of foods. Plaque is a sticky film of bacteria. When you do not remove plaque from your teeth daily, it builds up. Plaque bacteria use sugar to produce acids that attack enamel, the hard surface of the tooth. These acids are powerful enough to dissolve the hard enamel that covers your teeth. That’s how cavities get started. If you don’t eat much sugar, the bacteria can’t produce as much of the acid that eats away enamel. The acid attacks the tooth enamel for up to 20 min after you eat or drink. When you keep sipping on sugary drinks all day the the acid attacks the enamel again and again. Repeated acid attacks cause tooth decay. Choosing a healthy diet When choosing a snack think about what is in it, is it too sweet? Is it too chewy or gummy? The more chewy or the more gummy the snack the worse it is for your teeth. They stay in your teeth and in between your teeth longer than foods you just quickly chew and swallow. Think about how many times a day you snack. Do you snack all day or do you just leave the sugary treats for after dinner? The more times you snack a day, the more chance you have of getting cavities and plaque build-up. Damaging acids form in your mouth every time you eat a sugary snack. So when you snack, avoid soft, sweet, sticky foods such as cakes, candy and dried fruits. Instead, choose healthy foods such as nuts, raw vegetables, plain yogurt, cheese and sugarless gum or candy. Some ways to help avoid cavities and plaque build-up Everybody needs to sample a lemon tart or indulge in a piece of chocolate every now and then. If you do munch on these foods, it helps to eat the entire serving at one time, rather than make a sugary snack last all afternoon. And try to brush and floss your teeth afterwards, or at least drink a glass of water to help rinse sugar off your teeth. That way you can enjoy treats even more. Always keep your mouth moist by drinking lots of water. Saliva protects both hard and soft oral tissues. If you have a dry mouth, supplement your diet with sugarless candy or gum to stimulate...

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Sports Drinks and Your Teeth

Posted on Nov 11, 2015

Sports Drinks and Your Teeth

Recent studies have shown that the consumption of sports drinks can have damaging effects on your teeth. There is a high dosage of acidity and sugars in these drinks that is linked to weakening the enamel. This can eventually lead to tooth erosion, hypersensitivity and severe staining. Once the enamel becomes damaged the effects are irreparable. The teeth become weakened and more susceptible to growing cavities. Although we know completely eliminating sports drinks from your daily consumption may be impossible. There are a few steps that can be taken in order to decrease the negative side effects. Rinse after you drink After consuming a sports drink make sure to rinse your mouth out with water immediately. This will prevent any excess liquid (containing acidity) from resting on your teeth too long. This will make a big difference in the long run. 2. Wait before brushing It is also recommended to hold of from brushing your teeth for about an hour. This helps to decrease the amount acid (from the sports drink) around the other teeth. Although these steps may not seem effective at first, in the long run they will make a huge difference. Have you experience any sensitivity in your teeth after consuming sports drinks? Share with us your experience in the comments below. For dental concerns, call Pearl Dental Care at (909)...

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